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Forum » Test category » English language forum » Prepare For IELTS (Prepare For IELTS is a book of practice iELTS exams to help)
Prepare For IELTS
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:35 AM | Message # 76
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General Training Module Reading & Writing Practice Test 1
Writing Task 2
Many students going to tertiary colleges for the first time find it difficult to adjust to their new life because it is so different from high school.
Write a short report with suggestions for new students to help them to survive in tertiary study. Include suggestions about making friends, study habits, leisure activities and how to make best use of the college facilities.

*You should write at least 250 words.
* You may use ideas from relevant reading passages but do not copy words or phrases directly from them.
*You should spend about 30 minutes on this task.
Use This Space for Notes

General Training Module Reading & Writing Practice Test J \f\
Writing Task 1

 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:35 AM | Message # 77
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 Test Number 2
 Reading
Part 1. University of Technology, Sydney. Information Evenings
Read the following advertisement and answer Questions 1 and 2 on page 91.

Kiiring-gai Campus
INFORMATION EVENINGS
Bachelor of Business
Wednesday 29 August, 6.30pm
Diploma of Applied Science (Nursing)
Wednesday 15 August, 6.00pm and Monday 17September, 6.00pm
Bachelor of Applied Science (Information)
Bachelor of Education (Teacher Librarianship)
& Postgraduate Information Courses
Tuesday 28 August, 6.30pm
Bachelor of Arts (Human Movement Studies)
Bachelor of Arts (Leisure Studies)
Bachelor of Arts (Tourism Management)
Contact Schools for details 413 8497
Bachelor of Education (Primary) Sandwich
Bachelor of Educalion (Teacher Librarianship)
Friday 7 September, 6.30pm
Telephone Enquiries: 413 8200
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:35 AM | Message # 78
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part 1. University of Technology, Sydney. Information Evenings
Questions 1-2
Read the advertisement on page 90 and answer the questions below by writing the correct letter in the box on the Answer Sheet. The first one has been done as an example.
Example: If I am interested in studying Business I should go to find out about the
course on:
(a) Tuesday 15 August at 6pm
(b) Wednesday 25 September at 7pm
© Wednesday 29 August at 6.30pm

Ex C
1. To find out about Nursing studies I can go to the information evening on:
(a) Wednesday 29 August at 6pm
(b) Wednesday 15 August at 6pm
© Monday 17 September at 6pm
(d) Either (b) or © above
2. To find out about Tourism studies I should:
(a) telephone 413 8497
(b) attend the information night on Friday 7 September at 6.30pm
© attend the information night on Wednesday 15 August at 7pm
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:36 AM | Message # 79
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 Test Number 2
 Reading
Part 1. University of Technology, Sydney. Information Evenings
Read the following advertisement and answer Questions 1 and 2 on page 91.

Kiiring-gai Campus
INFORMATION EVENINGS
Bachelor of Business
Wednesday 29 August, 6.30pm
Diploma of Applied Science (Nursing)
Wednesday 15 August, 6.00pm and Monday 17September, 6.00pm
Bachelor of Applied Science (Information)
Bachelor of Education (Teacher Librarianship)
& Postgraduate Information Courses
Tuesday 28August, 6.30pm
Bachelor of Arts (Human Movement Studies)
Bachelor of Arts (Leisure Studies)
Bachelor of Arts (Tourism Management)
Contact Schools for details 413 8497
Bachelor of Education (Primary) Sandwich
Bachelor of Education (Teacher Librarianship)
Friday 7 September, 6.30pm
Telephone Enquiries: 413 8200
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:36 AM | Message # 80
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:i
part 1. University of Technology, Sydney. Information Evenings
Questions 1-2
Read the advertisement on page 90 and answer the questions below by writing the correct
letter in the box on the Answer Sheet. The first one has been done as an example. i
Example: If I am interested in studying Business I should go to find out about the
course on:
(a) Tuesday 15 August at 6pm
(b) Wednesday 25 September at 7pm
© Wednesday 29 August at 6.30pm

Ex C
To find out about Nursing studies I can go to the information evening on:
(a) Wednesday 29 August at 6pm
(b) Wednesday 15 August at 6pm
© Monday 17 September at 6pm
(d) Either (b) or © above
2. To find out about Tourism studies I should:
(a) telephone 413 8497
(b) attend the information night on Friday 7 September at 6.30pm
© attend the information night on Wednesday 15 August at 7pm
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:36 AM | Message # 81
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Part 3. Consumer Bookshelf
Read the following descriptions of books and answer Questions 8 -13 on page 95.

Book 1: A very interesting find comprehensive book, expecially if you want to do something practical to 'green' Australia. It offers constructive techniques for the regeneration of native species in both urban and rural settings. Chapters on botany, plant ecology, weeds, regeneration techniques, bushland management and project manage- ment are extremely well illustrated with colour photos and diagrams. A beautiful book and a real bargain. Book 2: Cut your energy bills and maximise the efficiency of your home with this specialised consumer guide.



Book 3: David Suzuki gives an excellent introduction to the topic of environmental science.Children aged 7-14 should enjoy this book with its interesting projects and activities — from testing air for pollution to makingrecycled paper. Book 4: Anyone who uses pesticides in the house or garden would benefit from this book about the hazards of their use and about safer alternatives.
Book 5: If you wait to avoid the plethora of specialised, packaged cleaning products (and pesticides) available and make your own from basic ingredients such as vinegar, baking soda and pure soap, this little book offers recipes trialled by the author and her friends.
Book 6: How much do you really know about the greenhouse effect? Written in a very readable style, this book fulfils the need for clear, scientifically accurate and Useful information about the greenhouse effect and its impact on Australia's climate, patterns of land use and energy consumption. A sobering book, but also helpful.
Book 7: Advice on which products are the most environmentally friendly to buy, and also an interesting and comprehensive explanation of the major environmental issues affecting Australia. Find out why the critics agree this is the best book of its kind.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:36 AM | Message # 82
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Part 3. Consumer Bookshelf
Question 8 -13
Read the descriptions of books in Part 3 of the reading passages. Answer Questions 8 -13
by matching the book titles below to the descriptions. Write the number of the book in
the box on the Answer Sheet. The first one has been done as an example. !
Example: Helen Wellings, Home Energy Guide

Ex 2
8. David Suzuki, Looking at the Environment. Activities for kids.
9. Dr Ian Lowe, Living in the Greenhouse. What to Expect; What to Do.

10. Paul Rogers, Safer Pest Control for Australian Homes and Gardens.
11. John Elkington and Julia Hailes, The Green Consumer Guide.
12. Barbara Lord, The Green Cleaner. How to Clean Nearly Everything.
13. Robin A. Buchanan, Bush Regeneration. Recovering Australian Landscapes.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:37 AM | Message # 83
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Part 4. A Guide to Toxics in the Home
Read the following passage and answer Questions 14 • 20 on page 97.

Widespread contamination of groundwatcr, soil diately pour salt or hot water on the stain and soak in
and air is not entirely due to Ihc irresponsibility milk before washing. GREASE: Pour boiling water on
of large industry. While this is a major factor it is also stains and follow with dry bicarb soda. Or try ammonia
true that you and 1 in our everyday lives arc contributing and water. INK: Soak in milk or remove with hydrogen
to Ihc slow poisoning of Ihe planet. Commonly used peroxide. BLOOD: Soak in warm water or remove with
substances such as many lypcs of paint Ihinners, house- hydrogen peroxide. For a more stubborn stain, mix
hold pesticides, cleaners and solvents and some aerosols cornflour or talcum powder with water and apply mix-
produce hazardous waste. lure. Allow to dry and brush away. COFFEE: Mix egg
yolk with lukewarm water and rub on stain. CI IEWING
This factshcct brings good news. There ARE alterna- GUM: Rub with ice. Gum will flake off. Alternatively
tives to 'household toxics'. Some of these products lake try a dab of eucalyptus oil. LIPSTICK: Rub with cold
time to prepare but they're cheaper than commercial cream and wash with washing soda.
products and, more importantly, they represent an in-
vestment in the future of the planet. Ovens. Combine strong version of all purpose
cleaner with bicarb soda: wear gloves when scrubbing.
Household Cleaners unit Polishes. When cleaning An easier oven cleaner is ammonia. (CAUTION: this
your home, keep in mind that you don't have to replace ammonia is strong solution ammonia available only
grease and dirt with chemicals dangerous to your family from chemists. It is a very caustic solution and great care
and Ihe environment. should be taken with handling. Rubber gloves should
be worn. If skin contact should occur wash with water
Most of your household cleaning needs can be met with immediately and bathe affected area with vinegar, a
seven simple ingredients: vinegar, pure soap, bicarb neutralising solution.) Place about 1/4 Cof ammonia in
soda, washing soda, borax, cloudy ammonia and strong a shallow pan (not alum inium) and add enough hot water
solution ammonia. All these arc available in your local to cover the bottom of the pan. I leal oven for 20 min-
supermarket or chemist. Various combinations of these utes, turn off and place pan in oven overnight. Take care
simple substances can accomplish most household to avoid inhaling ammonia fumes. Baked on food will
cleaning jobs cheaply and safely. Use caution with all be loosened, then the oven can be cleaned with bicarb
cleaners and remember that even environmentally sound soda and scrubbing.
cleaners may be unsafe if consumed.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:37 AM | Message # 84
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[i] Uuthroom. Most commercial tile cleaners do more
All Purpose Cleaner Key harm than good because they contain chlorine, a serious
(Mild Mixture): 1 C = 1 Cup = 250ml irritant to nose, eyes and skin and one of the most
4L hot water 1 T = 1 Tablespoon dangerous chemicals found in Australian sewers. For
1/4 C cloudy ammonia 1 I = 1 Teaspoon general bathroom cleaning, use a firm bristled brush
1 T bicarb soda 1 L = 1 Litre with cither bicarb soda and hot water or a mild version
of the all purpose cleaner. To clean toilet apply a thick
This solution issafe for all surfaces, can be rinsed with paste of borax and lemon juice to stubborn areas. Leave
water, and is very effective for most jobs. For a for two hours and scrub. Alternatively, a strong solution
stronger cleaner or wax stripper, double the amounts of vinegar can be used.
of all ingredients except water. Use gloves and do not
mix jvith other compounds, especially chlorine bleach. Garden Pests. Pesticides carry Ihe suffix 'cidcs'
which means 'killer'. Natural pesticides are cheaper and
WARNING: Never mix ammonia and bleach: an ex- safer for your family and pets. Here are three examples
tremely toxic gas is produced. of alternative pest sprays. SOAP: Use only pure soap, as
detergents will damage your plants. Liquid soaps: 2 T
Laundry. The best alternative for cleaning your per litre of water. Dry soaps: 50 grams per litre of water.
clothes is pure soap! Soap has accomplished the task of gelling garments white and bright for generations. Try TOBACCO WATER: This can be used against soft
bodied insects such as aphids, thrips and caterpillars.
this recipe for washing: Add 1/3 C washing soda (so- Place a large handful of tobacco in 4 litres of warm
dium carbonate) to water as machine is filling. Add water. Let stand for 24 hours. Dilute and apply with a
clothes. Add 1/2 C of soap. flakes. If water is hard, add spray bottle. This tobacco water is poisonous to humans.
extra washing soda. The following list gives some spe- Use caution when handling. HOT PEPPERS: Blend 2
cific solutions for stains: or 3 very hot peppers, 1/2 onion and 1 clove garlic in
HEAVILY SOILED: Rub with solution of 2 T washing water, boil, sleep for two days, and strain. This spray will
soda in 1 C warm water. FRUIT AND WINE: Imme- not damage indoor or outdoor plants.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:37 AM | Message # 85
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Part 4. A Guide to Toxics in the Home
Questions 14 - 20
Read the passage headed 'A Guide to Toxics in the Home'. Answer the following questions in the boxes on the Answer Sheet. The first one has been done as an example.
Example: What do many commonly used household substances produce that damages the environment?

Ex Hazardous waste
14. Do safe alternatives to environmentally dangerous household cleaners cost more or less than the commercial products?
15. If we take the advice of the writer of the passage, how many basic ingredients do we need to do the household cleaning?
16. What do you mix with bicarb soda and cloudy ammonia to make a general all purpose household cleaner?
17. Does milk help to remove wine stains from clothing? (Yes/No)
18. What very dangerous chemical can be used with care to clean ovens?
19. What serious skin irritant is found in most commercial tile cleaners?
20. Of the three alternatives to commercial plant sprays for use in the garden, which one is dangerous for humans?
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:37 AM | Message # 86
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Part 5. What Do Humans Eat?
Questions 21-29
Complete the text on the next page by choosing the correct word from the box and writing it in the boxes on the Answer Sheet. Note that there are more words than spaces. Each word can be used only once. The first one has been done as an example.

crops diet meat consume
available nutritional little cultural
increased technological doing availability
religious trying trial great
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:38 AM | Message # 87
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Part 5 continued
Example: People eat very different foods. In Australia, for example, the variety
of restaurants in the major cities reveals the varied example of people
from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Ex continued
Although some people eat no meat at all, as a whole Australians ....21
more meat and sugar than any other nation. The reasons for the different food customs in the world may be due to ....22.... differences between countries, as shown by people from different countries choosing and eating quite different foods, and preparing them in many different ways. The reasons may also be 23 as we can see in the religious beliefs about food that particular groups have.
If we look at history, we can see that food habits developed because of the ....24.?... of food, fashions in food and cultural influences. But how did people know what was good for them to eat and what was not good or even poisonous? It is likely that early humans learnt what to eat and what not to eat by ....25.... once all the kinds of food naturally available to them in their environment. Later, when people began to grow ....26.... and keep domesticated animals, the amount of food 27..... increased .
In the 20th century much attention has been paid to food processing and technology, but we have remained aware of the need to retain ....28.... value in processed foods. Many processed foods retain much of their value as nourishment, but in developed countries at least a dietary problem can arise because many foods of ....29.... nutritional value are now readily available as processed foods and are probably overconsumed.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:38 AM | Message # 88
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Part 6. UTS — A Smoke-Free Zone
Read the following passage and answer Questions 30 - 38 on pages 102 to 103.
'To achieve a smoke-free working environment, smoking will not be permitted inside any building on any campus of Ihe University or in any vehicle owned by the University from April 1,1990.'
The 'Smoke-Free Working Environment" policy at UTS was implemented in two stages:
Stage 1: an introductory stage which allowed staffand students who smoke time to consider the effects of this policy on themselves. This stage also provided assistance to smokers who wished to quit, and it allowed for the adequate signposting of buildings and vehicles. Stage 1 began on January 1, 1990.
Stage 2: from April 1,1990 smoking was totally prohibited in any building on any campus and within vehicles owned by the University.
The general aim of the gradual implementation was that by April 1, 1990, staff, students and visitors would have accepted that they cannot smoke in the buildings and facilities of the University of Technology, Sydney in the same way that people now accept that they cannot smoke in public transport, public hospitals or cinemas. Advertisments for positions vacant at UTS now carry an explanatory note stating 'This University has implemented a "Smoke-Free Working Environment" policy".
Reasons for this Policy
Section 15 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1983 states that 'Every employer shall ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of all his employees." It also states the employer should 'provide or maintain a working environment for his employees that is safe and without risks to health ...'. The penalty for not complying with these statements is $100,000 in the case of a corporation and $10,000 in other cases.
The University therefore has a legal obligation to comply with the Act or risk incurring prosecution and a subsequent fine. UTS, by implementing this policy, will also safeguard itself against potential workers' compensation or damages claims from employees or students who have been exposed to passive smoking.
Smoking
Smoking is the largest single preventable cause of death in Australia today. Approximately 23,000 Australians die each year as a result of diseases caused by smoking.
Short-Term Effects: * increased heart rate * increased blood pressure * increased pro- duction of stomach acid * increased levels of carbon dioxide, causing dizziness * increased hand tremor * decreased urine formation * decreased sensation of taste/appetite/smell * decreased physical endurance * irritation of allergies * staining of teeth and fingers * production of halitosis (bad breath).
Long-Term Effects: * narrowing/hardening of blood vessels in heart and brain* shortness of breath, cough and respiratory infections * chronic bronchitis * cancer of lung/larynx/kid- ney/oesophagus/bladder/mouth * stomach ulcers.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:38 AM | Message # 89
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Liabilities and Loss to Employers
To December 1986 there were seven successful passive smoking workers' compensation cases in Australia. Settlements ranged from $8,000 to $20,000. (In four of these cases settlements were undisclosed.)
passive Smoking
Passive smoking involves either smokers or non-smokers inhalirjgeither side stream and/or exhaled smoke. Research has identified the following effects on non-smokers experiencing passive smoking:
Acute: * eye irritation * coughing and headaches * asthmatic non-smokers have shown declines in respiratory function;
Chronic: * increased risk of lung cancer * increased risk of lung damage * increased risk of coronary heart disease.
There are many misconceptions related to passive smoking. These issues include: chemical exposure of non-smokers to mainstream and exhaled smoke; the priority of passive smoking as opposed to other safety issues; the invasion of privacy of smokers; ventilation and airconditioning.
Research has dealt with these issues to show that:
• chemical exposure to non-smokers from mainstream and exhaled smoke is significant;
• the health problems associated with passive smoking are a matter of priority as are other safety issues;

• the matter of choice exists with both smokers and non-smokers. Not only may smokers choose to smoke but non-smokers may also choose not to breathe main- stream or exhaled smoke;
• many non-smokers remain silent so as not to enter into conflict with co-workers or be branded as troublemakers by unsympathetic management;
• typical airconditioning may be overwhelmed by pollutant levels produced by smokers.
Further Facts on Smoking
Lost Working Days: In 1981 a total of 8.4 million working days were lost in Australia from absenteeism due to smoking-related illness.
Accidents: Research has shown that smokers have higher accident rates than non-smokers.
Cleaning and Maintenance Costs: American industries that have introduced non-smoking policies have reported 10-15 per cent savings on cleaning maintenance costs.
Life Insurance Policy Costs: Most Australian Life Assurance companies now offer reduced premiums to non-smokers and ex-smokers.
Fires: In 1980 the Board of Fire Commissioners of NSW found that discarded cigarettes or matches caused a total of 13,600 fires (including 900 building fires).
Information supplied by Iht UTS Occupational Htallh and Safely Branch.
 
BakhtiyorDate: Sunday, 2012-06-10, 11:38 AM | Message # 90
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Part 6. UTS — A Smoke-Free Zone
Questions 30-38
Read the passage on pages 100-101. Choose the correct answer for the following questions and write its"tetter in the box on the Answer Sheet. The first one has been done as an example.
Example: When did the total prohibition on smoking in campus buildings and vehicles begin?
(a) April 1, 1990
(b) January 1, 1990
© April 1, 1991

Ex a.
30. In which of the following places is smoking generally prohibited in Australia?
(a) hospitals
(b) public transport
© cinemas
(d) all of the above
31. As well as its legal obligation as an employer, which of the following reasons is given in the passage for the University's non-smoking policy?
(a) Public opinion has forced all public institutions to ban smoking indoors
(b) The University is concerned about the health of students
© The University wishes to protect itself against potential workers compensation claims from employees or students exposed to smoke
32. How many Australians die each year as a result of diseases caused by smoking?
(a) Approximately 230,000
(b) Approximately 23,000
© Approximately 2,300
 
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